Weekly Actions: June 14, 2017

Click on each action for details and scripts:

ACTION 1: Urge your Senator to vote NO on Trumpcare

ACTION 2: Demand a fair and open process for Senate consideration of the health care bill

ACTION 3: Advocate for affordable and sensible single-payer health care at the state level


Rumors are that calls are no longer at the level that they were right after the inauguration and that the GOP therefore feels emboldened (and perhaps pressured) to act quickly and ram a health care bill down our throats without giving people time to weigh in, despite the fact that only 17% of Americans approve of the Trumpcare bill. So please, even if you’ve already called, keep calling–especially on this important issue that literally means life and death for so many people.

 
HERE’S WHAT YOU CAN DO:
 

  • Call your Senators:
    • If your Senator(s) are already likely to vote against the GOP Health Care Bill, thank them, and also ask them to insist on an open process, including releasing the bill to the public well before it’s voted on, attaining a CBO score, holding committee hearings, and affording the Senate and the American people time to weigh in on the bill BEFORE it is voted on. (See Action #2 for more details and talking points.)
    • If your Senator is likely to vote for the GOP Health Care Bill, or is undecided, the Indivisible updated toolkit has more resources and facts to help you, as well as a call script. You can also get more information from The Resistance Manual. Here are some important talking points:
      • Only 17% of Americans approve of the Trumpcare bill
      • Under Trumpcare, 23 million people would lose their health insurance
      • Any moral health care bill should cover pre-existing conditions without extra cost, provide affordable reproductive healthcare to women (who were not involved in the drafting of Trumpcare), and make insurance affordable for low-income people (protect Medicaid)
      • Any health care bill – regardless of what it contains – should be vetted and voted on in a fair and open process (for more details on this, see Action 2)

       
      ***If you live in the states listed below, make sure to reach out to these key senators. Call them often! Reach out to any friends you have who live in these states and ask them to call:

      • Murkowski (Alaska), Heller (NV), Flake (AZ), Portman (OH), Gardner (CO), Cassidy (LA).
      • Other key states: Tennessee (Corker and Alexander); West Virginia (Capito); Arkansas (Cotton and Bozeman); Maine (Collins); Kentucky (Paul);

       

      Even worse than whatever might be contained in the new health care bill is the secrecy with which the process is being conducted. Unlike the process that led to the Affordable Care Act, there are no public drafts, no opportunities for public feedback (or feedback from important groups), and no hearings scheduled that allow senators to debate the bill and offer amendments.

       
      HERE’S WHAT YOU CAN DO:
       

      • Watch this 3-minute video of Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO) as she calls out Finance Chair, Orrin Hatch, for not scheduling a meeting. Share it widely and thank Senator McCaskill for speaking out.
      • Call Senate President Mitch McConnell, (office contact info here–try one of the local offices if his Washington voice mailbox is full) and finance chair Orrin Hatch (202-224-4515) and demand that there be a hearing and that the bill be scored by the CBO before a vote.

      Script:
      Hi, my name is _____ and I’m calling from _____. Hi, my name is _____________. I am calling Senator McConnell in his role as President of the Senate/Senator Hatch as Chair of the Finance Committee. I am extremely concerned about the process through which the health care bill is being approached. Important legislation that affects millions of lives cannot be drafted in secrecy: the American people deserve to know what’s in this bill well before it comes to a vote, and there should be hearings that allow all senators to weigh in on the bill and offer amendments, as was done before the Affordable Care Act was passed. I would like to ask that Senator McConnell/Senator Hatch put the interests of all Americans before an interest in scoring a “win” for the GOP, especially since this would not be a win for the GOP, but rather a colossal failure. According to a recent Quinnipiac University poll, only 17% of Americans approve of Trumpcare. If Senator McConnell/Hatch is truly interested in fixing Obamacare and coming up with a plan that will make things better for the majority of Americans, then any health care bill should be fully vetted and debated – not rushed through in secrecy – and all Americans should have a chance to express opinions to their representatives before a vote.

       

      Legislative chambers in California and New York have recently voted in favor of a single-payer health care bill. Several other states including Massachusetts, Colorado, Illinois, Maine, Maryland Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington have also been working on single-payer legislation. While there are still several hurdles to cross, the time to make our voices heard on this issue is now!
       

      HERE’S WHAT YOU CAN DO:
       

      • Check out Healthcare-now.org, which lists state bills that push single-payer health care and the organizations helping to pursue this legislation. Check whether a bill has been introduced in your state, its status, and how you can get involved in your state’s efforts to pass it. This site also has many resources for advocating for single-payer health care at the national level.
      • If you live in a state that hasn’t introduced single-payer legislation yet (or worse, fear that you live in a state that might take advantage of the odious waiver system if Trumpcare were passed) make sure to contact your state representatives and make your opinions heard.

       


      The most effective thing you can do is to pick up the phone, but if you’re short on time, you can leave a message or video below.